For a physician referral

866-705-ECHI(3244)


526 Moye Blvd
Greenville, NC 27834

For a physician referral

866-705-ECHI(3244)


526 Moye Blvd
Greenville, NC 27834

Vascular Stenting

 Our vascular team has done groundbreaking work in minimally invasive techniques, and Vidant Medical Center is a pioneering institution in the use of stent grafts for abdominal aortic aneurysms. Vidant Medical Center was one of 20 institutions selected to participate in the endovascular stent trials, and ours is the only hospital selected from the state of North Carolina for Phase II of the trial. Because we participate in national clinical trials for the evaluation of stents and stent-grafts, we are able to offer the latest treatment options at our center. Heart Institute physicians also perform carotid and renal stent procedures.
  
 

Endovascular Stents

In the field of peripheral vascular surgery, our pioneering use of endovascular stent grafts for abdominal aortic aneurysms is yet another example of our commitment to minimally invasive techniques. Our center leads the state in endovascular aneurysm repair, a technique for treating problems in the blood vessels by placing a stent inside the vessel to reopen it and add support.
  

Carotid Stents

Several types of stents are available for treating cardiovascular disease of the carotid artery. Advanced filter devices, combined with antiplatelet medication, are used to capture any particles that are released and prevent them from going to the brain to cause a stroke. Carotid artery stenting has recently been approved for coverage by Medicare.
  

Aortic Aneurysm Stents

 

The vascular surgery team at Vidant Medical Center  is one of the first to offer stent treatment for aortic aneurysm in the chest, giving patients the option of a less risky operation and a better chance of survival. Technology to diagnose the condition is available in the Emergency Department, giving surgeons the ability to determine the problem and begin treatment quickly. Previously, this condition was treated with surgical procedures to bypass the diseased artery. Now, this major blood vessel can often be repaired with a stent that is inserted through an artery in the leg. For the patient, a four-day stay in the hospital has been reduced to six or seven hours, and a 15-inch scar on the chest has been replaced by a one-inch incision in the leg. In many cases, the patient can go back to work in a day or so.